Marshal Baghramyan (Yerevan Metro)


JTM, 30W 2x10" combo This amp was in production from to Where Does Your Money Go? In exchange for the necessary funding to build this new factory Rose Morris acquired the exclusive worldwide rights to distribute Marshall amps for the next 15 years. They were fitted with four 50W 15" Celestion Greenback speakers. Spec sheet Marshall,

The JTM50's


Sadly, Jim Marshall, the Guv'nor, passed away on april 5th Tube humbly salutes the Father of Loud. Jim Marshall started building amps in He did this together with technical friend Ken Bran. Their first amps were very heavily "inspired" on the Fender Tweed 4x10" Bassman. Little did they know then that they were at the threshold of a rock 'n roll revolution Although this division is not entirely accurate, it does give a good impression of the different era's.

The first decade in the history of Marshall is regarded by some as the "Golden Years". In the following overview, I try to place the amps in some kind of chronological ordering. Keep in mind that allthough I try to be complete, this is obviously not a complete list, though I hope it will be some day The very first prototype Marshall amps were built in in Jim's kitchen.

In these early years the amps, their features and especially the cosmetics varied a lot. This was the very first Marshall amp. It was built from up to It didn't actually have a model number at first, but later it was called a JTM It is said that the first prototype and early production amps were fitted with two beam power tetrodes, three ECC83's and a GZ34 rectifier tube, but soon KT66 tubes were used instead of the 's. These amps had 2 channels with each a volume control and two inputs making a total of four inputs.

There was also a power switch and a standby switch with a power indicator. The first JTM45 amps had no model number printed on them.

These first speaker cabinets didn't have a model number at first. In these cabinets were given the model number They were angled front cabinets and were fitted with four 12" Celestion G speakers, instead of the four 10" Jensen speakers in an open cabinet like Fender did.

Late or early the ceramic speakers were replacing the alnico's. This amp used the bass tremolo chassis in a 2x12" combo cabinet. Very few of the 2x12" horizontal extension cabinets were built and these cabinets are very rare. The speakers were two Celestion G speakers.

These G speakers were 'M' magnet speakers with an H cone. These are not the small magnet Gs, but are actually 25W Greenbacks with a different cone, sounding different than a typical 25W Greenback from a 's 4x12 cab.

This amp was in production from to It had 4 channels and 8 inputs. It had 2 channels and 4 inputs. It was the PA version of the It was the Bass version of the The original JTM45 was renamed to this model The tremolo was optional. Photograph of a JTM45 from It was the Organ version of the In Marshall switched to EL34 tubes.

So the JTM50 amps were in production for less than a year from to By the cabinets were rated as having a maximum power handling of 75 watts. This increased power handling was probably due to the four Celestion ceramic speakers fitted in these cabinets. These were probably G Greenbacks. In the first prototype and production W amps model were constructed using two 50W output transformers. Shortly later W output transformers were used. The early incarnations of the JTM's varied in design. The JTM's were the first amps to use solid state rectifiers.

A tube rectifier was just too much hassle and too expensive. Schematically, all the JTM's are all very similar. The PA version had 4 channels and 8 inputs instead of the usual 4 inputs and 2 channels. The Tremolo version was an idea of Pete Townsend but it wasn't very popular and not many were produced. This amp had 4 channels and 8 inputs. A lot maybe all? Photograph of a Super PA probably from This cabinet was introduced in late It was the first W cabinet being fitted with four Celestion G12M25 speakers.

In the top left corner of the cabinet a 'W' logo could be seen. This amp had 2 channels and 4 inputs. It was the Bass version of T or the Tremolo version of the In Marshall introduced the Marshall amps.

These amps only had 3 knobs: Treble, Bass and Volume. This early Marshall was also known as "the Pig". In the course of the Low-High tone control circuitry was changed to a Low-Mid-High tone control and these amps were now called the Marshall Majors. Using four KT88 power tubes, these amps were very powerfull, very loud and very expensive. They were in production up to Photograph of a rare Marshall head a. In Marshall introduced the 18W "practice" combo amps.

Although they were not very loud, they certainly could "rock". There were originally 3 combo models: They had a tremolo and an optional reverb. These 18W amps were discontinued in , to be succeeded by the 20W Marshalls. You might want to check out Gabster's Marshall 18W page. Lots of info and pictures here, including a forum. In Marshall introduced the 20W amps as the successors of the 18W amps.

These amps didn't sound quite as good as the original 18W amps though. These amps used two EL84 tubes in the power amp, two ECC83's in the pre amp and a solid state rectifier in the power supply. These amps were discontinued around This set consisted of a 20W head amp and two speaker cabinets each with fitted two 13"x8" eliptical speakers.

Photograph of a PA20 from In July Marshall dropped the Plexi face plates and switched to the gold colored brushed aluminium metal face plates as we know them still today. The US distributor at that time Unicord Inc. Too many Marshalls were coming back under warranty with defective output tubes. Instead of fitting new EL34's, Unicord decided to fit 's, thinking that these "heavier" tubes would last beyond the warranty period.

This in itself was true, but many American guitar players were wandering why their Marshall amps sounded so different from their European brothers. Some people actually like the bright sound of the 's in their Marshall amps but most guitar players prefer the original sound of the EL34's. This amp was in production only shortly from up to It looks just like a 20W Marshall amp. It's a 4 input, 2 channel amp featuring a tremolo. Standard pre amp circuits with 2x ECC83 Marshall, ?

Photograph of a beautiful red JMP from This amp was in production from up to It was the tremolo version of the It used the tremolo chassis in a 4x10" combo cabinet. See Jacques Marshall Bluesbreaker page for some nice pictures. It used the tremolo chassis in a 2x12" combo cabinet. This is a two channel amp, one channel is that of a Lead amp and the other channel is that of a Bass amp, making it quite a versatile amp. The is the combo version of this head. From onwards the cabinet was fitted with four Celestion G12H30 speakers.

It was discontinued in just prior to the introduction of the JCM range. This is the Bass version of the amp. It features a high treble channel and a normal channel. Photograph of a JMP from Photograph courtesy Joe Pampel of Obsolete Electronics. This is the Organ version of the amp. The and Master PA amps introduced in were the first 19" rack mount Marshall amps. Later this was expanded to 6 inputs and 6 channels. This amp was produced using the last tremolo chassis in Artiste head cabinets, so sometimes these a heads are referred to as Artiste's which they are not!

This amp was only shortly in production from up to Photograph of a JMP Photograph courtesy of Nils Hörnfalk. This amp was in production from early up to late It had a transistor pre amp and a 1x EL84 power amp. These amps were available in a black and red covering. Amp schematic with 1x EL84 Marshall. It is pretty rare as it was only available through mailorder.

This is a two channel amp, one channel is that of an Lead amp and the other channel is that of an Bass amp. The is the head version of this combo. Photograph of a red JMP from This is a 2x12" combo version of the head. Photograph of a JMP probably from Photograph courtesy of Nick Henry.

Photograph courtesy of Neil Preston. This amp was probably in production from up to It was fitted with a reverb and a 6dB Boost foot switch. These combo's were fitted with two Marshall labeled Celestion 12" speakers. Pre amp schematic, Marshall, Note the JCM style switches. Only a couple of hundred of these amps were manufactured. Thanx to Roger Pearce! The Club and Country were introduced in april and were discontinued in These 's were first fitted with two McKenzie 12" 80W speakers.

The Club and Country amps were introduced in april and were discontinued in These 's were fitted with four Marshall labeled Celestion T 10" speakers. Although these aren't tube amps, these amps are still a small part of the Marshall story. They were Marshalls first venture into solid state country. These amps weren't particularly good sounding or popular. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

It was one of the first all transistor Marshall combo's. It was the bass model of the It has two channels and an effects loop. It was one of the first all transistor Marshall heads. It was meant for use with a cabinet.

This was the head version of the Master Lead Combo. Pre amp schematic, Marshall. Power amp schematic, Marshall. Thanx to Richard Hinton. It was the bass version of the head. It was meant for use with the cabinet. Thanks to Bent Egner. This amp and cabinet was in production from up to It was an all transistor Master Volume amp.

Amp schematic, Marshall, Photograph of a JMP top. It was an all transistor Master Volume combo amp. This was the combo version of the Master Lead head. It was an all transistor amp.

It is said that these amps were only available through mail order. It was an all transistor Master Volume combo amp with a reverb. The Artiste amps were in production from up to The Artiste speaker cabinets were in production from to In the brochures they were called Artist, but the panels on the amps show Artiste.

This amp had 2 channels and 4 inputs and a reverb. It was meant for lead, bass and organ use. I've seen these combo's fitted with Celestion G12H30 speakers. This two piece setup, the head and cabinet, were sold together as Model The head amp was also available seperately as model The schematic is the same as that for the Artiste amp. This amp had 2 channels and 4 inputs and a reverb, identical to the Artiste The cabinet was a very tall straight front 4x12" cabinet.

The Lead and Bass heads are probably the loudest and most powerfull Marshall tube amps ever built. These amps were introduced in april , around the same time as the JCM series. It isn't clear if these amps were actually part of the JCM series.

The schematics suggest they are, but you won't find JCM printed on the amps. These high power Lead cabinets were made for the Lead head. See the Marshall Amps page for more "official" information on the amps. Having been finally freed from the 15 year exclusive Rose Morris distribution contract, Marshall launched the new JCM serie early in The PA and Organ amps and cabinets were dropped.

The JCM amps had a larger logo than before, and the heads also featured grille cloth on the upper two thirds of the front instead of being completely covered with the usual black vinyl. In , the 20th anniversary of Marshall Amps, some of the JCM amps were issued in neat white vinyl.

Under the JCM "regime", the model numbering was changed. The heads retained their original model numbers, but the combo's were given model numbers in the range. The solid state and hybrid heads were given model numbers in the range and the solid state combo's were given model numbers in the range. The solid state amps didn't have JCM printed on their panels.

User manual for Master Volume and Lead models: Pre amp schematic with 2x ECC83 Marshall, Spec sheet Marshall, Photograph of a red JCM from User manual for Split Channel models: Pre amp schematic with 4x ECC83 Marshall, CA datasheet Intersil, The Studio 15 was a bit of a Marshall oddball. It was in production from up to This is the only Marshall amp ever to use 6V6 output tubes.

It was the first Marshall to be fitted with a Celestion G12 Vintage 30 speaker. It is said that no more than of these were built. Photograph courtesy of Mike Carlyle. This amp is an early combo version of the head. It is electrically identical to the Photograph of a JCM This amp is a 2x12" combo version of the head. These amps were introduced in april and were discontinued in They were seamlessly integrated into the JCM program in , be it only for shortly.

This amp is the 1x12" combo version of the head. Owners manual for the 3. Thanx to John Walker. Photograph of a JCM combo on the extension cabinet. Thanx to Jelle Falk. This amp is a combo version of the head.

I've seen these amps fitted with 2 Celestion G12T speakers. This amp is the 2x12" combo version of the head. This extension cabinet was introduced in It was discontinued in Photograph of a JCM cabinet. These cabinets were intoduced in These cabinets were in production from up to These cabinets were intended for the transistor head. These cabinets had smaller dimensions than the usual 4x12's, and they were part of the "Mini-Stack" range. These "high power" cabinets were in production from upto This line of amps and cabinets was soon to be revamped into the IBS range.

Amp schematic, Issue 2 Marshall, This bass combo was in production from upto The schematics date from however. Photograph of a Bass combo. This cabinet were in production form up to This cabinet was primarily meant as an extension cabinet for the Bass combo. These cabinets were in production form up to This extension cabinet was in production form up to The Artist amps had a tube power amp and a solid state preamp. Don't confuse these amps with the 's Artiste's.

It isn't quite clear to me whether or not these amps were actually part of the JCM range, as these amps don't have the JCM logo's, but they were included in the JCM catalog and they were manufactured in the same period and had the same looks and style. The Artist was introduced in and discontinued in The is the combo version of the head. Pre amp schematic solid state , CT Issue 2 Marshall, Photograph of a head.

Thanx to Christoph Arndt. The Artist 30 was introduced in and discontinued in The is the mini stack head version of the Photograph of a Artist from Allthough these amps do not contain any tubes, I feel that the Marshall amps story is incomplete without mentioning these amps. The was in production from upto It's a transistorised Master Volume head and it's the head version of the combo.

It was produced in black, white, red and green vinyl. In the Silver Jubilee year it was produced in silver vinyl and a chrome face plate. Photograph of a Micro Stack. The head was introduced in and discontinued in It was the head version of the combo. Photograph of a stack. This Mini Stack head was introduced in and was discontinued in The is the head version of the combo.

User manual for Transistor Split Channel models: Preamp schematic, Issue 4 Marshall, Photograph of a mini stack. This head was introduced in and was discontinued in This is a transistorised Master Volume Split Channel head with reverb.

Preamp schematic, Issue 3 Marshall, This combo was introduced in and discontinued in Photograph of a This combo was introduced in maybe and discontinued in It is a transistorised version of the JCM combo. Schematic, Issue 8 Marshall, Thanx to Michael J. This combo was introduced in and was discontinued in It is a transistorised Split Channel combo.

It was fitted with a Celestion G12M70 speaker. The was introduced in and it was discontinued in This combo is the transistorised version of the combo. This amp had a reverb and an effects loop.

It had a dark red chassis. Amp schematic, Issue 5 Marshall, Amp schematic, Issue 3 Marshall, It was fitted with 2 Celestion G12M70 speakers and had a reverb and an effects loop.

It is a three channel amp, with a clean channel and a split overdrive channel. A schematic, Issue 5 Marshall, B schematic, Issue 3 Marshall, PSU and power amp schematic, Issue 2 Marshall, Photograph of a thanx to Kevin Wilson.

It was the combo version of the head. Preamp schematic, Issue 5 Marshall, Power amp schematic, Issue 3 Marshall, This combo was probably introduced in Amp schematic, Issue 1 Marshall, Photograph of a Reverb This keyboard combo was introduced in and was discontinued in Reading Skills Group 1 - Levels. Networking for a Job Omar Loves to Read! Go To Reading Skills Homepage. Click on the links below.

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